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What tests will help diagnose mantle cell lymphoma?

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Your doctor may also use several tests to diagnose mantle cell lymphoma:

Blood tests. Your doctor takes some of your blood and sends it to a lab to get analyzed. The blood tests show how many blood cells you have, how well your kidneys and liver are working, and whether you have certain proteins in your blood that suggest you have mantle cell lymphoma.

Biopsy. Your doctor may want to check a sample of the tissue in a lymph node. To do that, he'll remove either the whole lymph node or part of it. The lymph nodes in your neck, armpits, and groin are close to your skin. Your doctor will numb your skin. He’ll then make a small cut and remove a sample of the lymph node. It's usually an outpatient procedure, which means you don't have to stay overnight in a hospital.

Using a microscope, experts will look at the sample to see if there are cancer cells. They also test the tissue for cell changes and other signs that point to mantle cell lymphoma.

Your doctor may also take samples of your bone marrow, usually from your hip bone, to see if the cancer has spread. You lie down on a table and get a shot that numbs the area. Then your doctor uses a needle to remove a small amount of liquid bone marrow. He will look at the sample under a microscope and check for cancer cells.

Your doctor may also suggest imaging tests to look for tumors throughout your body. These may include:

CT scan. It's a powerful X-ray that makes detailed pictures of the inside of your body.

PET scan. This test uses a bit of radioactive material to look for signs of cancer.

Colonoscopy. In this procedure, your doctor looks at the inside of your colon by inserting a thin, lighted tube into your rectum. You're not awake for this test, so you don't feel any pain. The colon, also called the large intestine, is a common place for mantle cell lymphoma to spread.

These tests not only help to diagnose mantle cell lymphoma, they also help your doctor determine how far the cancer has spread and how fast it's growing.

From: Mantle Cell Lymphoma WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Types of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma."

Cancercare.org: "Mantle Cell Lymphoma and New Treatments on the Horizon."

Leukemia & Lymphoma Society: "Get Information and Support," "Mantle Cell Lymphoma Facts."

Harvard Health Publications, Harvard Medical School: "Lymph Node Biopsy."

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on February 3, 2019

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Types of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma."

Cancercare.org: "Mantle Cell Lymphoma and New Treatments on the Horizon."

Leukemia & Lymphoma Society: "Get Information and Support," "Mantle Cell Lymphoma Facts."

Harvard Health Publications, Harvard Medical School: "Lymph Node Biopsy."

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on February 3, 2019

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