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What therapy has been approved for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)?

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The FDA has approved a form of immune cell gene therapy called CAR T-cell therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). It uses some of your own immune cells, called T cells, to treat your cancer. Doctors take the cells out of your blood and add new genes to them. The new T cells are better able to find and kill cancer cells.

From: Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on September 8, 2017

Medically Reviewed on 9/8/2017

SOURCES: 

American Cancer Society: "What is acute lymphocytic leukemia?"  "How is acute lymphocytic leukemia classified?"  "What are the risk factors for acute lymphocytic leukemia?" "How is acute lymphocytic leukemia diagnosed?"  "Treating Leukemia -- Acute Lymphocytic (ALL) in Adults;" and "Response rates to treatment." 

The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society: "Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia" and "Leukemia Facts & Statistics."

ARIAD Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

FDA: “FDA approval brings first gene therapy to the United States.”

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on September 8, 2017

SOURCES: 

American Cancer Society: "What is acute lymphocytic leukemia?"  "How is acute lymphocytic leukemia classified?"  "What are the risk factors for acute lymphocytic leukemia?" "How is acute lymphocytic leukemia diagnosed?"  "Treating Leukemia -- Acute Lymphocytic (ALL) in Adults;" and "Response rates to treatment." 

The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society: "Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia" and "Leukemia Facts & Statistics."

ARIAD Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

FDA: “FDA approval brings first gene therapy to the United States.”

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on September 8, 2017

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What is acute myeloid leukemia (AML)?

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