Reviewed by Laura Martin on March 23, 2017

Sources

Quincy Washington<br>Multiple Myeloma Patient<br>Latrenda Washington<br>Quincy’s Wife<br>Wendy Baer, MD<br>Medical Director, Psychiatric Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute<br>Sagar Lonial, MD<br>Oncologist and Chief Medical Officer, Winship Cancer Institute

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WebMD Voices

Tom Z., 54
Red Bank, NJ
Get involved with the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation to be around other active and positive people with MM. Do yoga and meditation. Find something to be passionate about. Explore your creative side. I took up photography. Attitude is everything. Stay positive –– new treatments are being discovered yearly.
Pat C., 70
Fayetteville, GA
Don't feel guilty because you cannot do as much as you used to. Ask for help with things that leave you a bit exhausted. My friends did small things like let me out of the car right in front of the door. Support groups are important. Sharing your experience with others with the same disease is so helpful.
Carol M., 59
Vero Beach, FL
With good nutrition, whatever exercise you can manage, and an active social life, you can still lead a happy, productive life. I'm not saying it's easy because it's not. Quitting sugar, eating green, taking naps, getting massages, trying to lead a stress-free life, and keeping busy is exhausting. But it works.
Jim W., 51
Kansas City, MO
The first thing is to get a second opinion. This is, to me, the most important thing to do. Your doctor may only treat three or four myeloma patients a year. You want to go to a doctor who sees at least 50 myeloma patients a year or is part of a practice that sees 100 myeloma patients a year.
Eric A., 51
Annapolis, MD
To help with fatigue, I've always received my treatments on Friday afternoon. This allows me to go home straight after. I then have the weekend to rest and recuperate. Typically the second day after treatment has me feeling the worst. I try to make time for extra rest and a nap in the afternoon on Sunday.
Bob T., 61
Forest Hills, NY
One of the most important things that I learned when I was diagnosed with myeloma is not to shut out the world or go quiet. Tell people what happened. It isn't some sort of thing that you should view as a weakness or a mark of shame. You need to get comfort and information. Isolation will only breed fear.
Michelle C., 51
New York, NY
Infection can not only put you in the hospital but prevent you from continuing treatment. Keeping well while being around children all the time can be tricky. It's important to wear a mask regularly if you must be in a crowd. If you can, enjoy vacations and high traffic places while your numbers are good!