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How can serum protein electrophoresis (SPEP) help diagnose multiple myeloma?

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Serum protein electrophoresis (SPEP) is a test for multiple myeloma, a cancer of the bone marrow. It measures the immunoglobulins (antibodies) in your blood. Your body makes these when it's fighting off something. The test looks specifically for unusually high amount of an immunoglobulin known as the M protein. It's released by cancerous plasma cells called myeloma cells, and finding it in your blood can be the first step to diagnosing multiple myeloma. The lower your level of M protein, the less likely your cancer has spread.

From: Multiple Myeloma Diagnosis and Tests WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Tests to Find Multiple Myeloma."

The Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation: "What is Multiple Myeloma?," "Multiple Myeloma Diagnosis," "Diagnostic Tests," "Flow Cytometry Test."

University of Rochester Medical Center: "24-Hour Urine Collection."

Lab Tests Online: “Multiple Myeloma.”

Mayo Clinic: “Biopsy: Types of biopsy procedures used to diagnose cancer.”

American Cancer Society: “Tests to Find Multiple Myeloma.”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on September 16, 2018

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Tests to Find Multiple Myeloma."

The Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation: "What is Multiple Myeloma?," "Multiple Myeloma Diagnosis," "Diagnostic Tests," "Flow Cytometry Test."

University of Rochester Medical Center: "24-Hour Urine Collection."

Lab Tests Online: “Multiple Myeloma.”

Mayo Clinic: “Biopsy: Types of biopsy procedures used to diagnose cancer.”

American Cancer Society: “Tests to Find Multiple Myeloma.”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on September 16, 2018

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How can immunofixation help diagnose multiple myeloma?

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