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How does TBI help multiple myeloma?

ANSWER

Total body irradiation (TBI) can prepare your bone marrow to accept donated stem cells that help you fight your cancer. (Marrow is a soft, spongy tissue inside your bones.)

Radiation beams are aimed at your whole body to help slow down your immune system. This will make sure you don’t reject your new stem cells.

The treatment can harm healthy tissue or organs, especially your lungs. Your therapist will use blocks to protect you.

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: “Radiation therapy for multiple myeloma.”

Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation: “Multiple Myeloma Treatment Guide.”

University of Utah Health Care: “What to Know About Radiation Therapy for Multiple Myeloma.”

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center: “Support for Bone-Related Problems.”

National Comprehensive Cancer Network: “NCCN Guidelines for Patients: Multiple Myeloma.”

University of California at San Diego Moores Cancer Center: “Total Body Irradiation (TBI).”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on October 7, 2018

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: “Radiation therapy for multiple myeloma.”

Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation: “Multiple Myeloma Treatment Guide.”

University of Utah Health Care: “What to Know About Radiation Therapy for Multiple Myeloma.”

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center: “Support for Bone-Related Problems.”

National Comprehensive Cancer Network: “NCCN Guidelines for Patients: Multiple Myeloma.”

University of California at San Diego Moores Cancer Center: “Total Body Irradiation (TBI).”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on October 7, 2018

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