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What increases your chances of getting multiple myeloma?

ANSWER

Things that make your risk go up include:

  • Age. Most people with multiple myeloma are 45 or older. More than half are 65 or older.
  • Race. The disease is nearly twice as common in African-Americans.
  • Being male. It’s slightly more common in men.
  • Being overweight.
  • Other people in your family have had multiple myeloma.
  • You’ve had another plasma cell disease.

From: What Is Multiple Myeloma? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

The Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation: “Learn the Basics About Multiple Myeloma,” “Risk Factors for Multiple Myeloma,” “Multiple Myeloma Symptoms,” “Multiple Myeloma Tests.”

American Red Cross: “Plasma.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Multiple Myeloma.”

The American Cancer Society: “Do We Know What Causes Multiple Myeloma?” “What Are the Risk Factors for Multiple Myeloma?” “Signs and Symptoms of Multiple Myeloma,” “Staging Multiple Myeloma,” “Diagnosing Multiple Myeloma from Test Results,” “How Is Multiple Myeloma Staged?”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on September 16, 2018

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

SOURCES:

The Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation: “Learn the Basics About Multiple Myeloma,” “Risk Factors for Multiple Myeloma,” “Multiple Myeloma Symptoms,” “Multiple Myeloma Tests.”

American Red Cross: “Plasma.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Multiple Myeloma.”

The American Cancer Society: “Do We Know What Causes Multiple Myeloma?” “What Are the Risk Factors for Multiple Myeloma?” “Signs and Symptoms of Multiple Myeloma,” “Staging Multiple Myeloma,” “Diagnosing Multiple Myeloma from Test Results,” “How Is Multiple Myeloma Staged?”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on September 16, 2018

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