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Where is the most common place affected by fractures caused by multiple myeloma?

ANSWER

The spine is the most common place for a pathologic fracture, but it can happen in your ribs or pelvis and other bones as well. Bones that make up the spine -- called vertebrae -- can become so weak they collapse. These are compression fractures.

They’re very painful and can cause a hunched posture and a loss of height; they also can make it difficult for you to move. Because your spine has shortened, you don’t have as much space in your chest and abdomen. This can make it harder for you to breathe and eat.

SOURCES:

Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation: "Bone Lesions and Damage," "Bone Marrow Tests," "Kyphoplasty," "Multiple Myeloma Tests," "Orthopedic Interventions," "Vertebroplasty," "What are bisphosphonates?"

National Comprehensive Cancer Network: "About multiple myeloma."

Sigurdur, K., Minter, A., Korde, N., Tan, E., Landgren, O. , published online May 1, 2012. Bone disease in multiple myeloma and precursor disease: novel diagnostic approaches and implications on clinical management

University of Pennsylvania Health System: "All About Multiple Myeloma."

U.S. Food and Drug Administration: "Bisphosphonates (marketed as Actonel, Actonel+Ca, Aredia, Boniva, Didronel, Fosamax, Fosamax+D, Reclast, Skelid, and Zometa) Information."

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on October 2, 2018

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

SOURCES:

Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation: "Bone Lesions and Damage," "Bone Marrow Tests," "Kyphoplasty," "Multiple Myeloma Tests," "Orthopedic Interventions," "Vertebroplasty," "What are bisphosphonates?"

National Comprehensive Cancer Network: "About multiple myeloma."

Sigurdur, K., Minter, A., Korde, N., Tan, E., Landgren, O. , published online May 1, 2012. Bone disease in multiple myeloma and precursor disease: novel diagnostic approaches and implications on clinical management

University of Pennsylvania Health System: "All About Multiple Myeloma."

U.S. Food and Drug Administration: "Bisphosphonates (marketed as Actonel, Actonel+Ca, Aredia, Boniva, Didronel, Fosamax, Fosamax+D, Reclast, Skelid, and Zometa) Information."

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on October 2, 2018

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