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As I’m being treated for cancer, how can I get support for everyday tasks?

ANSWER

To get support as you’re being treated for cancer, just let people help. If someone says, "What can I do?" have an answer for them.

Let people pitch in with everyday chores like cooking, cleaning, and running errands. Ask a friend to write down important questions, and make sure you ask them. Let someone help keep track of your insurance and appointments.

Remember that your friends and family probably will be happy if you reach out and say you'd love a certain snack or could use help with a task.

From: Build Your Support Network WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Comprehensive Cancer Network: "Finding Support Systems for People with Cancer."

American Society of Clinical Oncology: "Finding Support and Information."

American Academy of Family Physicians: "Cancer: Helping Your Family Help You."

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center:  "10 Tips for Supporting a Friend with Cancer."

Dana-Farber Caregiving Institute: "How to Create a Caregiving Plan."

American Cancer Society: "Online Communities and Support."

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on January 23, 2019

SOURCES:

National Comprehensive Cancer Network: "Finding Support Systems for People with Cancer."

American Society of Clinical Oncology: "Finding Support and Information."

American Academy of Family Physicians: "Cancer: Helping Your Family Help You."

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center:  "10 Tips for Supporting a Friend with Cancer."

Dana-Farber Caregiving Institute: "How to Create a Caregiving Plan."

American Cancer Society: "Online Communities and Support."

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on January 23, 2019

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What are the benefits of online support as I’m being treated cancer?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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