PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

How are catheters used in chemotherapy treatments?

ANSWER

To deliver the drugs more effectively, your doctor may use catheters. These soft, thin tubes hold liquid drugs. They go in one of the larger blood vessels in your body, such as in your chest. They stay in your body between treatments so you don't have to get stuck with a needle every time. Depending on the type of cancer you have or the treatment you need, you might get a catheter that goes near your spinal cord. Other kinds go into a hollow space in your chest, belly, or pelvis. Once the drugs are injected, your doctor will remove this kind of catheter.

From: How Do I Take Chemotherapy Drugs? WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on February 22, 2018

Medically Reviewed on 2/22/2018

SOURCES:

National Cancer Institute: “Chemotherapy and You.”

The Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania: “Chemotherapy: The Basics.”

American Cancer Society: “Questions about Chemotherapy,” “Planning Drug Doses and Schedules.”

Cancer Research UK: “Why Plan Chemotherapy?”

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on February 22, 2018

SOURCES:

National Cancer Institute: “Chemotherapy and You.”

The Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania: “Chemotherapy: The Basics.”

American Cancer Society: “Questions about Chemotherapy,” “Planning Drug Doses and Schedules.”

Cancer Research UK: “Why Plan Chemotherapy?”

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on February 22, 2018

NEXT QUESTION:

How are ports used in chemotherapy treatments?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.