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How can chemotherapy affect your brain?

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If you feel a little foggy when your treatment is done, you might have a touch of "chemo brain." You may find it hard to concentrate or remember names and dates. You also may forget things easily or have trouble doing more than one thing at a time.

Doctors don’t know exactly what causes chemo brain. It seems more likely to happen if you had higher doses of chemotherapy.

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Chemotherapy Side Effects," "How Cancer Treatments Can Affect Fertility in Men," "How Cancer Treatments Can Affect Fertility in Women," "Chemo Brain."

Mayo Clinic: "What late effects might people who were treated for childhood cancers experience?" "Can chemotherapy side effects increase the risk of heart disease?"

Susan G. Komen: "Long-Term Side Effects of Chemotherapy."

Breastcancer.org: "When Will Your Hair Grow Back?"

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute: "Your Body after Treatment."

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on February 22, 2018

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Chemotherapy Side Effects," "How Cancer Treatments Can Affect Fertility in Men," "How Cancer Treatments Can Affect Fertility in Women," "Chemo Brain."

Mayo Clinic: "What late effects might people who were treated for childhood cancers experience?" "Can chemotherapy side effects increase the risk of heart disease?"

Susan G. Komen: "Long-Term Side Effects of Chemotherapy."

Breastcancer.org: "When Will Your Hair Grow Back?"

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute: "Your Body after Treatment."

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on February 22, 2018

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How can chemotherapy affect your heart?

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