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How can my doctor help me if my testicles are removed as part of testicular cancer treatment?

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If you still hope to father children after testicular cancer surgery, you might want to talk to your doctor about saving, or banking, some of your sperm before surgery. Also, testosterone supplements, which are most often given through injections, skin patches or a gel, can boost levels of that hormone.

From: Life After Testicular Cancer Surgery WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Cancer Institute.

National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Program.

American Cancer Society.

Testicular Cancer Awareness Foundation.

Johns Hopkins Medicine, James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute, “Orchiectomy (Radical Orchiectomy, Testis Sparing Surgery)."

Cancer Research UK, “Your Sex Life and Testicular Cancer.”

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, “Retrograde Ejaculation.”

Cleveland Clinic, “Testicular Prosthesis.”

The Mayo Clinic, “Testicular Cancer: Coping and Support.”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on November 11, 2018

SOURCES:

National Cancer Institute.

National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Program.

American Cancer Society.

Testicular Cancer Awareness Foundation.

Johns Hopkins Medicine, James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute, “Orchiectomy (Radical Orchiectomy, Testis Sparing Surgery)."

Cancer Research UK, “Your Sex Life and Testicular Cancer.”

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, “Retrograde Ejaculation.”

Cleveland Clinic, “Testicular Prosthesis.”

The Mayo Clinic, “Testicular Cancer: Coping and Support.”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on November 11, 2018

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What happens if I get a woman pregnant during or after testicular cancer treatment?

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