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How can someone avoid dehydration with cancer treatments?

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Make sure you drink enough water before, during, and after your treatment. Here’s how:

  • Sip all day. It isn’t enough to just drink water when you’re parched. You can get dehydrated and never feel thirsty. Some health experts suggest at least eight glasses of liquid a day, even more if you have diarrhea or vomiting. Ask your doctor how much sounds right for you.
  • Try other liquids. If water doesn't grab you, try something else. Milk, juice, sports drinks, and decaf coffee or tea all count toward fluids. Sometimes, drinks with ice are easier to swallow.

SOURCES:

American Society of Clinical Oncology: "Dehydration."

Breastcancer.org: "Dehydration."

Cleveland Clinic: "4 Things You Should Know About Cancer and Dehydration."

American Institute for Cancer Research: "Nutrition During Cancer Treatment."

FDA: "Xeloda (capecitabine) Tablets."

Marshfield Clinic: "Stay hydrated during cancer treatment."

OncoLink: "Preventing Dehydration During Cancer Treatment."

American Cancer Society: "Dehydration and Lack of Fluids."

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on January 23, 2019

SOURCES:

American Society of Clinical Oncology: "Dehydration."

Breastcancer.org: "Dehydration."

Cleveland Clinic: "4 Things You Should Know About Cancer and Dehydration."

American Institute for Cancer Research: "Nutrition During Cancer Treatment."

FDA: "Xeloda (capecitabine) Tablets."

Marshfield Clinic: "Stay hydrated during cancer treatment."

OncoLink: "Preventing Dehydration During Cancer Treatment."

American Cancer Society: "Dehydration and Lack of Fluids."

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on January 23, 2019

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How does tiredness affect cancer patients?

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