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How do general immunotherapies work?

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Immunotherapies work by boosting the activity of your immune system in general, without targeting a tumor. A more active immune system can better fight cancer. General immunotherapies fall into a few different classes of drugs, including:

  • Interleukins
  • Interferons
  • Colony stimulating factors

From: Types of Immunotherapy WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: “Cancer Vaccines,” “Immune checkpoint inhibitors to treat cancer,” “Monoclonal antibodies to treat cancer,” “Non-specific cancer immunotherapies and adjuvants,” “What is cancer immunotherapy?” “What’s new in cancer immunotherapy research?”

National Cancer Institute: “Immunotherapy.”

Mayo Clinic: “What cancers may be treated with monoclonal antibody drugs?”

Rambam Maimonides Medical Journal : “Adoptive T Cell Immunotherapy for Cancer.”

MD Anderson Cancer Center: “Immunotherapy.”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on January 20, 2019

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: “Cancer Vaccines,” “Immune checkpoint inhibitors to treat cancer,” “Monoclonal antibodies to treat cancer,” “Non-specific cancer immunotherapies and adjuvants,” “What is cancer immunotherapy?” “What’s new in cancer immunotherapy research?”

National Cancer Institute: “Immunotherapy.”

Mayo Clinic: “What cancers may be treated with monoclonal antibody drugs?”

Rambam Maimonides Medical Journal : “Adoptive T Cell Immunotherapy for Cancer.”

MD Anderson Cancer Center: “Immunotherapy.”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on January 20, 2019

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