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How do pain and stress cause cancer-related fatigue?

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Research shows that chronic, severe pain increases fatigue, and that stress can worsen feelings of fatigue. Stress can result from dealing with the disease and the "unknowns," as well as from worrying about daily accomplishments or trying to meet the expectations of others.

From: Cancer-Related Fatigue WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCE: National Cancer Institute.

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on January 22, 2017

SOURCE: National Cancer Institute.

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on January 22, 2017

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How does a tumor-induced hypermetabolic state cause cancer-related fatigue?

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