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How do schwannomas develop?

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Schwannomas form in the tissue that surrounds and insulates nerves. Schwannomas develop when schwann cells -- the cells that form the covering around nerve fibers -- grow abnormally.

Schwannomas typically develop along nerves of the head and neck.

From: Neurofibrosarcoma and Schwannoma WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Cincinnati Brain Tumor Center: "Nerve Sheath Tumors."

The University Hospital: "Treatment of NF1."

Children's Hospital Boston: "Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor (Neurofibrosarcoma)."

Neville H. ; March 2003. Journal of Pediatric Surgery

Acoustic Neuroma Association: "What is Acoustic Neuroma."

National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders.:"Vestibular Schwannoma (Acoustic Neuroma) and Neurofibromatosis."

Fletcher, Christopher D.M. , 3rd ed., Philadelphia, Saunders Elsevier; 2007. Diagnostic Histopathology of Tumors

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on November 25, 2018

SOURCES:

Cincinnati Brain Tumor Center: "Nerve Sheath Tumors."

The University Hospital: "Treatment of NF1."

Children's Hospital Boston: "Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor (Neurofibrosarcoma)."

Neville H. ; March 2003. Journal of Pediatric Surgery

Acoustic Neuroma Association: "What is Acoustic Neuroma."

National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders.:"Vestibular Schwannoma (Acoustic Neuroma) and Neurofibromatosis."

Fletcher, Christopher D.M. , 3rd ed., Philadelphia, Saunders Elsevier; 2007. Diagnostic Histopathology of Tumors

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on November 25, 2018

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