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How do thyroid hormone pills help treat papillary thyroid carcinoma?

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You start taking these after surgery. It gives your body the thyroid hormones that you no longer make, since your thyroid has been removed. You'll typically take one pill a day for the rest of your life.

The pill also stops your body from making thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). Stopping TSH is a key part of treatment because if you have any thyroid cells left, TSH could trigger their growth. And that would raise the odds that cancer could return.

SOURCES:

Columbia Thyroid Center: "Papillary Thyroid Cancer," "Thyroid Biopsy Clinic."

NIH, National Cancer Institute: "Thyroid Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)-Patient Version."

Mayo Clinic: "Thyroid Cancer."

The American Association of Endocrine Surgeons: "Thyroid cancer: Papillary Thyroid Cancer (PTC)."

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center: "Thyroid Cancer."

National Health Service: "Thyroid Cancer."

Medscape: "Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma."

American Cancer Society: "Treatment of Thyroid Cancer, by Type and Stage."

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on October 28, 2019

SOURCES:

Columbia Thyroid Center: "Papillary Thyroid Cancer," "Thyroid Biopsy Clinic."

NIH, National Cancer Institute: "Thyroid Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)-Patient Version."

Mayo Clinic: "Thyroid Cancer."

The American Association of Endocrine Surgeons: "Thyroid cancer: Papillary Thyroid Cancer (PTC)."

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center: "Thyroid Cancer."

National Health Service: "Thyroid Cancer."

Medscape: "Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma."

American Cancer Society: "Treatment of Thyroid Cancer, by Type and Stage."

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on October 28, 2019

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What follow-up care will you need after getting papillary thyroid carcinoma treatment?

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