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How does adrenal cancer develop?

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Adrenal cancer is part of a group of diseases called neuroendocrine tumors, or NETs. These can form in different glands all over your body. If you have adrenal cancer, sometimes your tumor begins in the outer layer of your adrenal glands, which your doctor may refer to as the cortex. The disease can also start with a tumor that grows in the middle part, called the medulla. It can happen in one or both of your adrenal glands. These glands make hormones, chemicals that help control how your body works. They affect things like hair growth, blood pressure, your sex drive, and even how you handle stress. When you have adrenal cancer, you might notice changes in these areas. Many adrenal tumors actually make hormones of their own. This is called a "functioning tumor." You may notice symptoms like sudden weight gain or a flushed face.

From: Adrenal Cancer WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "What is adrenal cancer?"

National Cancer Institute: "Adrenocortical Carcinoma."

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center: "Adrenal Tumors."

MD Anderson Cancer Center: "Adrenal Tumors."

Diane Reidy-Lagunes, MD, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

UptoDate: "Adrenal Cancer."

Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario on March 04, 2019

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "What is adrenal cancer?"

National Cancer Institute: "Adrenocortical Carcinoma."

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center: "Adrenal Tumors."

MD Anderson Cancer Center: "Adrenal Tumors."

Diane Reidy-Lagunes, MD, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

UptoDate: "Adrenal Cancer."

Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario on March 04, 2019

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What causes adrenal cancer?

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