PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

How does tailored medicine work?

ANSWER

There are many ways a doctor can tailor your treatment plan. She might:

Doctors can also use your individual and family health history, things in your lifestyle like diet and exercise habits, and environmental exposures to decide on the right treatment for you.

  • Look at your genes to decide if a medication will work for you.
  • Test cells in your tumor to find out what kind of treatment to use.
  • Do a genetic test to see if you have changes that make it more likely for you to get certain diseases.

From: What Is Tailored Medicine? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

The White House: "Fact Sheet: President Obama's Precision Medicine Initiative.”

National Institutes of Health/All of Us Research Program: "About the Precision Medicine Initiative," “Data and Research Center.”

American Cancer Society: “Personalized Medicine: Redefining Cancer and Its Treatment.”

Elizabeth A. McGlynn, PhD, vice president, Kaiser Permanente Research, Oakland, CA.

Milan Radovich, PhD, medical co-director, Indiana University/IU Health Precision Genomics Program, Indianapolis.

Eric Dishman, director, All of Us Research Program, National Institutes of Health.

NIH Genetics Home Reference: "Do all gene mutations affect health and development?"

University of Utah Genetic Science Learning Center: "More Examples of Precision Medicine in Action."

Stefan C. Grant, MD, associate professor, hematology & oncology, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, NC.

Intermountain Healthcare: "Talking to Your Doctor: Precision Medicine."

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on January 23, 2019

SOURCES:

The White House: "Fact Sheet: President Obama's Precision Medicine Initiative.”

National Institutes of Health/All of Us Research Program: "About the Precision Medicine Initiative," “Data and Research Center.”

American Cancer Society: “Personalized Medicine: Redefining Cancer and Its Treatment.”

Elizabeth A. McGlynn, PhD, vice president, Kaiser Permanente Research, Oakland, CA.

Milan Radovich, PhD, medical co-director, Indiana University/IU Health Precision Genomics Program, Indianapolis.

Eric Dishman, director, All of Us Research Program, National Institutes of Health.

NIH Genetics Home Reference: "Do all gene mutations affect health and development?"

University of Utah Genetic Science Learning Center: "More Examples of Precision Medicine in Action."

Stefan C. Grant, MD, associate professor, hematology & oncology, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, NC.

Intermountain Healthcare: "Talking to Your Doctor: Precision Medicine."

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on January 23, 2019

NEXT QUESTION:

How can nongenetic information help with tailored medicine?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

"ALEXA, ASK WEBMD"

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.