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How is a chemo brain diagnosed?

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If you’re in a mental fog, talk to your medical provider. He or she will ask about your symptoms and want to know when your problems started and how they affect your everyday life. They may ask what makes your symptoms worse and better. Do you, for example, feel better in the morning than at night? Does it help when you're active, when you eat, or after you've rested? Provide a list of all the medicines you take, even if they aren't for cancer.

From: What Is Chemo Brain? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Chemo Brain."

American Society of Clinical Oncology: "Attention, Thinking, or Memory Problems."

Gordon, D. , April/May 2014. Neurology Now

The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center: "Chemobrain."

CancerCare: “Cognitive Problems After Chemotherapy.”

Reviewed by Carmelita Swiner on January 23, 2020

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Chemo Brain."

American Society of Clinical Oncology: "Attention, Thinking, or Memory Problems."

Gordon, D. , April/May 2014. Neurology Now

The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center: "Chemobrain."

CancerCare: “Cognitive Problems After Chemotherapy.”

Reviewed by Carmelita Swiner on January 23, 2020

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