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How is drug therapy used to treat carcinoid syndrome?

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Injected drugs such as lanreotide, octreotide, and pasireotide can help with skin flushing. They may also have a small effect on stopping tumor growth. Octreotide can ease diarrhea, too.

These work by attaching to carcinoid cells and cutting down on the amount of chemicals they make. Their side effects can include nausea, gallstones, and pain or bruising where you inject it.

In some cases, doctors give octreotide with a low-dose injection of a man-made protein called alpha interferon to boost your body's response.

From: Carcinoid Syndrome WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Octreotide."

American Family Physician: "Carcinoid Tumors."

Carcinoid Cancer Foundation.

Merck Manual Home Edition: "Carcinoid Tumors and Carcinoid Syndrome," "Carcinoid Syndrome."

National Cancer Institute: "Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors Treatment."

National Organization for Rare Disorders: "Carcinoid Syndrome."

Caring for Carcinoid Foundation: "Carcinoid Syndrome."

Cleveland Clinic: "Radionuclide Scanning (Nuclear Medicine Imaging)."

UpToDate: "Treatment of the carcinoid syndrome."

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on November 10, 2017

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Octreotide."

American Family Physician: "Carcinoid Tumors."

Carcinoid Cancer Foundation.

Merck Manual Home Edition: "Carcinoid Tumors and Carcinoid Syndrome," "Carcinoid Syndrome."

National Cancer Institute: "Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors Treatment."

National Organization for Rare Disorders: "Carcinoid Syndrome."

Caring for Carcinoid Foundation: "Carcinoid Syndrome."

Cleveland Clinic: "Radionuclide Scanning (Nuclear Medicine Imaging)."

UpToDate: "Treatment of the carcinoid syndrome."

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on November 10, 2017

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What foods should you avoid to prevent carcinoid syndrome?

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