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How is integrative medicine used to treat cancer?

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  • You might hear it called integrative oncology. No matter what the name, the idea is the same: Treat the whole patient, not just the disease. For cancer patients especially, that includes ways to ease stress and worry and boost your sense of well-being. You might try: Acupuncture. A practitioner inserts thin needles into your skin at certain points on your body.
  • Exercise programs. It should include aerobic activity like walking or swimming, strength training, and flexibility exercises.
  • Massage. A therapist rubs or kneads your muscles.
  • Meditation. You focus all your thoughts on a single word -- or nothing at all.
  • Nutrition counseling. A registered dietitian helps you manage weight changes and nausea.
  • Yoga. This mix of physical poses and meditation can help you relax.

From: What Is Integrative Medicine? WebMD Medical Reference

Duke Integrative Medicine: “What is Integrative Medicine?”

American Board of Physician Specialties: “The Advantages and Benefits to Integrative Medicine.”

National Cancer Institute: “Complementary and Alternative Medicine.”

University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center: “Integrative Medicine Center Clinical Services.”

American Society of Clinical Oncology: “Types of Complementary Therapies,” “Evaluating Complementary and Alternative Therapies.”

UpToDate: “Patient education: Complementary and alternative medicine treatments (CAM) for cancer (Beyond the Basics).”

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health: “Complementary, Alternative, or Integrative Health: What’s In a Name?” “Meditation: “In Depth,” “Yoga: In Depth.”

Reviewed by Sabrina Felson on May 25, 2019

Duke Integrative Medicine: “What is Integrative Medicine?”

American Board of Physician Specialties: “The Advantages and Benefits to Integrative Medicine.”

National Cancer Institute: “Complementary and Alternative Medicine.”

University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center: “Integrative Medicine Center Clinical Services.”

American Society of Clinical Oncology: “Types of Complementary Therapies,” “Evaluating Complementary and Alternative Therapies.”

UpToDate: “Patient education: Complementary and alternative medicine treatments (CAM) for cancer (Beyond the Basics).”

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health: “Complementary, Alternative, or Integrative Health: What’s In a Name?” “Meditation: “In Depth,” “Yoga: In Depth.”

Reviewed by Sabrina Felson on May 25, 2019

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