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How is myelosuppression treated?

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Your doctor can treat myelosuppression with:

Medications. Some medicines help your body make more red blood cells, neutrophils, or platelets.

Change in medications. If you have myelosuppression because of cancer treatment, your doctor may give you different chemo drugs or delay your next session.

Transfusion. In severe cases, you may need to get blood through an IV, which puts it directly into a vein in your arm through a small tube.

SOURCES:

National Cancer Institute: “NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms: Myelosuppression.”

International Myeloma Foundation: “Myelosuppression.”

Oncology Nursing Forum: “Management of myelosuppression in the patient with cancer.”

Children’s Hospital of the King’s Daughters: “Anemia Due to Bone Marrow Suppression.”

Lymphoma Canada: “Myelosuppression.”

Myeloma UK: “Myeloma Academy Nursing Best Practice Guide: Myelosuppression."

Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center: “Bone marrow suppression.”

Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing: “Myelosuppression, Bone Disease, and Acute Renal Failure: Evidence-Based Recommendations for Oncologic Emergencies.”

Canadian Cancer Society: “Low blood cells counts,” "Bone marrow aspiration and biopsy."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on July 02, 2019

SOURCES:

National Cancer Institute: “NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms: Myelosuppression.”

International Myeloma Foundation: “Myelosuppression.”

Oncology Nursing Forum: “Management of myelosuppression in the patient with cancer.”

Children’s Hospital of the King’s Daughters: “Anemia Due to Bone Marrow Suppression.”

Lymphoma Canada: “Myelosuppression.”

Myeloma UK: “Myeloma Academy Nursing Best Practice Guide: Myelosuppression."

Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center: “Bone marrow suppression.”

Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing: “Myelosuppression, Bone Disease, and Acute Renal Failure: Evidence-Based Recommendations for Oncologic Emergencies.”

Canadian Cancer Society: “Low blood cells counts,” "Bone marrow aspiration and biopsy."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on July 02, 2019

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