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How will my doctor treat me if I have radiation sickness?

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The doctor will try to help you fight off infections if you have radiation sickness. You might get blood transfusions to replace lost blood cells. You could get medications to try to help your bone marrow recover. Or your doctor may try a transplant.

He'll give you fluids and treat other injuries like burns. Recovery from radiation sickness can take up to two years. But you'll still be at risk of other health problems after recovery. For example, your odds of getting cancer are higher.

From: What Is Radiation Sickness? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Radiation Effects Research Commission: "Frequently Asked Questions."

Garau, M. , July 2011. Reports of Practical Oncology and Radiotherapy

U.S. Atomic Energy Commission: "Medical Effects of Atomic Bombs."

World Health Organization.

International Atomic Energy Agency.

Health Physics Society: "Doses from Medical X-Ray Procedures."

The Mayo Clinic: "Radiation Sickness."

Baverstock, K. , May 2006. Environmental Health Perspectives

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on October 28, 2018

SOURCES:

U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Radiation Effects Research Commission: "Frequently Asked Questions."

Garau, M. , July 2011. Reports of Practical Oncology and Radiotherapy

U.S. Atomic Energy Commission: "Medical Effects of Atomic Bombs."

World Health Organization.

International Atomic Energy Agency.

Health Physics Society: "Doses from Medical X-Ray Procedures."

The Mayo Clinic: "Radiation Sickness."

Baverstock, K. , May 2006. Environmental Health Perspectives

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on October 28, 2018

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