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Is there medication for myelofibrosis?

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The drugs fedratinib (Inrebic) pacritinib (Vonjo), and ruxolitinib (Jakafi) are approved to treat MF. Most people with MF have a mutation, or change, in one of their genes that tell their body how to make blood cells. These inhibitors are used to block the processes those faulty genes

The medications can ease some MF symptoms like anemia, enlarged spleen, bone pain, itching, and night sweats. But they can have side effects, like an increase in platelets, which might lead to blood clots, or make your anemia worse. You might also have bruising, dizziness, or headaches.

SOURCES:

MPN Research Foundation: “What Is Primary Myelofibrosis (MF)?”

Leukemia and Lymphoma Society: “Treatment,” “Myelofibrosis Facts,” “Support Resources.”

Mayo Clinic.org: “Myelofibrosis: Treatments and drugs,” “Myelofibrosis: Coping and support.”

American Cancer Society: “Myelodysplastic Syndromes Overview,” “Find Support Programs and Services in Your Area.”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on November 3, 2020

SOURCES:

MPN Research Foundation: “What Is Primary Myelofibrosis (MF)?”

Leukemia and Lymphoma Society: “Treatment,” “Myelofibrosis Facts,” “Support Resources.”

Mayo Clinic.org: “Myelofibrosis: Treatments and drugs,” “Myelofibrosis: Coping and support.”

American Cancer Society: “Myelodysplastic Syndromes Overview,” “Find Support Programs and Services in Your Area.”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on November 3, 2020

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What are the benefits and side effects of taking ruxolitinib (Jakafi) for myelofibrosis?

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