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What are myelodysplastic syndromes?

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Myelodysplastic syndromes are a rare group of disorders where your body no longer makes enough healthy blood cells. They're a type of cancer.

You might sometimes hear MDS called a "bone marrow failure disorder." When you have one, your bone marrow isn't working the way it should. It makes low numbers of blood cells or defective ones.

Some cases are mild while others are more severe. It varies from person to person, depending on the type you have, among other things.

SOURCES:

National Cancer Institute: "General Information About Myelodysplastic Syndromes."

American Cancer Society: "Myelodysplastic Syndromes."

DeAngelo, D, Myelodysplastic Syndromes: Biology and Treatment, in Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice, Saunders Elsevier, 2013.

National Heart Lung and Blood Institute: "What is Fanconi Anemia?"

National Library of Medicine: "Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome," "Severe Congenital Neutropenia."

Ferri's Netter Patient Advisor: "Managing your myelodysplastic syndrome."

Nemours (KidsHealth.org): “About Down Syndrome.”

NIH. U.S. National Library of Medicine: “Bloom syndrome,” “Ataxia-telangiectasia,” “Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria,” “Severe congenital neutropenia.”

American Cancer Society: “Benzene and Cancer Risk.”

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on March 13, 2019

SOURCES:

National Cancer Institute: "General Information About Myelodysplastic Syndromes."

American Cancer Society: "Myelodysplastic Syndromes."

DeAngelo, D, Myelodysplastic Syndromes: Biology and Treatment, in Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice, Saunders Elsevier, 2013.

National Heart Lung and Blood Institute: "What is Fanconi Anemia?"

National Library of Medicine: "Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome," "Severe Congenital Neutropenia."

Ferri's Netter Patient Advisor: "Managing your myelodysplastic syndrome."

Nemours (KidsHealth.org): “About Down Syndrome.”

NIH. U.S. National Library of Medicine: “Bloom syndrome,” “Ataxia-telangiectasia,” “Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria,” “Severe congenital neutropenia.”

American Cancer Society: “Benzene and Cancer Risk.”

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on March 13, 2019

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