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What are some good protein options for my smoothie?

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Good sources of protein include:

Look for low-sugar protein powders, with things such as whey, hemp, rice, or pea. A budget-friendly option is dry skim milk powder. Don't go overboard with the protein. Your body can't process more than about 30 grams of it at once.

  • Nut butters or whole nuts
  • Unsweetened Greek yogurt
  • Protein powder

SOURCES:

American Institute for Cancer Research: “Blueberry Blast Smoothie,” “Mango Carrot Ginger Smoothie,” “Tips to Build a Better Smoothie.”

Cleveland Clinic: “6 Tips for Smoothies When You Have Cancer.”

FDA: “Food Safety for People with Cancer.”

Mayo Clinic: “Cancer Causes: Popular Myths About the Causes of Cancer.”

National Cancer Institute: “Eating Hints: Before, During, and After Cancer Treatment.”

National Foundation for Cancer Research: “Green Goddess: Healthy Anti-Cancer Smoothie Recipe.”

Pancreatic Cancer Action Network: “The Power of Protein Smoothies for Pancreatic Cancer Patients.”

Penn Medicine OncoLink: “Protein Needs During Cancer Treatment.”

Stanford Health Care: “Tips for Making Smoothies and Shakes.”

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center: “How to Make a Healthier Smoothie.”

University of California San Francisco Helen Diller Comprehensive Cancer Center: “Rainbow Smoothie.”

Reviewed by Kathleen M. Zelman on December 11, 2019

SOURCES:

American Institute for Cancer Research: “Blueberry Blast Smoothie,” “Mango Carrot Ginger Smoothie,” “Tips to Build a Better Smoothie.”

Cleveland Clinic: “6 Tips for Smoothies When You Have Cancer.”

FDA: “Food Safety for People with Cancer.”

Mayo Clinic: “Cancer Causes: Popular Myths About the Causes of Cancer.”

National Cancer Institute: “Eating Hints: Before, During, and After Cancer Treatment.”

National Foundation for Cancer Research: “Green Goddess: Healthy Anti-Cancer Smoothie Recipe.”

Pancreatic Cancer Action Network: “The Power of Protein Smoothies for Pancreatic Cancer Patients.”

Penn Medicine OncoLink: “Protein Needs During Cancer Treatment.”

Stanford Health Care: “Tips for Making Smoothies and Shakes.”

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center: “How to Make a Healthier Smoothie.”

University of California San Francisco Helen Diller Comprehensive Cancer Center: “Rainbow Smoothie.”

Reviewed by Kathleen M. Zelman on December 11, 2019

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Which liquids are best for me to put into my smoothie?

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