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What are some grooming checklist for caregivers for people with cancer?

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  • Taking care of appearance can help someone with cancer feel more in control. Women might want to wear makeup. Men might want to shave (use electric shaver for safety).
  • For someone getting chemotherapy, good dental care is important to avoid infections. Offer waxed dental floss, a soft-bristle toothbrush, and fluoride toothpaste without whitening or tartar control. Ask their doctor about flossing if the person’s gums bleed and they have low levels of platelets in her blood.
  • Make a mouth rinse by mixing 1/2 teaspoon baking soda with 1 cup of water to use after each tooth brushing.
  • Avoid store-bought mouthwash. It can have alcohol or chemicals that may be irritating.

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Caring for the Patient with Cancer at Home," "What It Takes to Be a Caregiver."

Cancer Council SA: "Skin Care During Cancer Treatment."

Cancer Research UK: "Social life and activities during chemotherapy."

Cancer Support Community: "Mind Body."

University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center: "Mouth Care for Chemotherapy Patients."

Moffitt Cancer Center: "Hair Loss and Cancer."

National Cancer Institute: "Eating Hints."

Reviewed by Louise Chang on June 12, 2018

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Caring for the Patient with Cancer at Home," "What It Takes to Be a Caregiver."

Cancer Council SA: "Skin Care During Cancer Treatment."

Cancer Research UK: "Social life and activities during chemotherapy."

Cancer Support Community: "Mind Body."

University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center: "Mouth Care for Chemotherapy Patients."

Moffitt Cancer Center: "Hair Loss and Cancer."

National Cancer Institute: "Eating Hints."

Reviewed by Louise Chang on June 12, 2018

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