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What are some other ways to stay hydrated during cancer treatments?

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  • Foods count toward hydration, too. Soups, frozen pops, gelatins, fruits, and vegetables all have liquids. Choose foods with high water content, like watermelon, lettuce, and broccoli.
  • Suck on ice chips. A few at a time will give you a little liquid. It takes a lot to add up to a glass of water, but every little bit helps. If you can, at least try small sips of liquid.
  • Keep track. Record how many times you have vomiting or diarrhea. This will help if you have to call your doctor about symptoms.

SOURCES:

American Society of Clinical Oncology: "Dehydration."

Breastcancer.org: "Dehydration."

Cleveland Clinic: "4 Things You Should Know About Cancer and Dehydration."

American Institute for Cancer Research: "Nutrition During Cancer Treatment."

FDA: "Xeloda (capecitabine) Tablets."

Marshfield Clinic: "Stay hydrated during cancer treatment."

OncoLink: "Preventing Dehydration During Cancer Treatment."

American Cancer Society: "Dehydration and Lack of Fluids."

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on January 23, 2019

SOURCES:

American Society of Clinical Oncology: "Dehydration."

Breastcancer.org: "Dehydration."

Cleveland Clinic: "4 Things You Should Know About Cancer and Dehydration."

American Institute for Cancer Research: "Nutrition During Cancer Treatment."

FDA: "Xeloda (capecitabine) Tablets."

Marshfield Clinic: "Stay hydrated during cancer treatment."

OncoLink: "Preventing Dehydration During Cancer Treatment."

American Cancer Society: "Dehydration and Lack of Fluids."

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on January 23, 2019

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What are some signs of dehydration from cancer treatment?

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