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What are some types of radiology scans?

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Radiology scans include X-rays, CT scans, ultrasound images, MRI, and PET scans.

From: What Is a Radiologist? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Board of Radiology: “Diagnostic Radiology,” “Interventional Radiology.”

American College of Radiology: “What Is a Radiologist?”

American Medical Association: “Radiation Oncology.”

Radiological Society of North America: “Professions in Diagnostic Radiology,” “Computer Tomography (CT) Safety During Pregnancy.”

University of California San Francisco Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging: “Prepare for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI),” “PET/CT Scan: How to Prepare, What to Expect & Safety Tips.” 

National Health Service (UK): “Who can have one: MRI scan.”

MedlinePlus: “MRI Scans.”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on September 15, 2019

SOURCES:

American Board of Radiology: “Diagnostic Radiology,” “Interventional Radiology.”

American College of Radiology: “What Is a Radiologist?”

American Medical Association: “Radiation Oncology.”

Radiological Society of North America: “Professions in Diagnostic Radiology,” “Computer Tomography (CT) Safety During Pregnancy.”

University of California San Francisco Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging: “Prepare for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI),” “PET/CT Scan: How to Prepare, What to Expect & Safety Tips.” 

National Health Service (UK): “Who can have one: MRI scan.”

MedlinePlus: “MRI Scans.”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on September 15, 2019

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