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What are the symptoms of a soft tissue sarcoma?

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The most common sign of a soft tissue sarcoma is a painless lump or growth. But some may not be noticeable until they’re big enough to press on nearby muscles or nerves. About one in five soft tissue sarcomas happen in the belly. They’re often found after they cause other problems, like stomach pain, bleeding, or a blocked intestine. A sarcoma in your lungs or chest might be found only after you have chest pain or trouble breathing. About 10% of the time, a sarcoma will start on your head or neck. The most common type of soft tissue sarcoma in children, known as rhabdomyosarcoma, happens mostly in those areas.

From: What Is a Soft Tissue Sarcoma? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Cancer Institute.

American Cancer Society.

The Mayo Clinic: “Soft Tissue Sarcoma.”

Sarcoma Foundation of America: “Patient resources.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Sarcoma.”

American Society of Clinical Oncologists.

Cancer Research UK: “Living with Soft Tissue Sarcoma.”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on February 28, 2018

SOURCES:

National Cancer Institute.

American Cancer Society.

The Mayo Clinic: “Soft Tissue Sarcoma.”

Sarcoma Foundation of America: “Patient resources.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Sarcoma.”

American Society of Clinical Oncologists.

Cancer Research UK: “Living with Soft Tissue Sarcoma.”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on February 28, 2018

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When should you see a doctor about the symptoms of a soft tissue sarcoma?

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