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What can you do to take care of yourself during treatment for renal cell carcinoma?

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You can do things during and after your treatment to feel stronger physically and emotionally. Try these:

  • Eat well. You need calories and nutrients to stay strong for treatment. If it’s hard for you to eat, try smaller meals every few hours instead of three big meals.
  • Keep moving. Exercise is good for your body and your mind. Your treatment may leave you feeling tired, so be sure to balance activity with rest.
  • Follow your treatment plan. Keep your doctor in the loop about any changes in how you’re feeling.
  • Get support. It’s important to take care of your emotional health, too. Trained counselors and support groups can offer safe places to talk about how you and your loved ones feel. You should also ask for help from family, friends, and members of your community.

From: Renal Cell Carcinoma WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Kidney Cancer (Adult) - Renal Cell Carcinoma."

Medscape: "Renal Cell Carcinoma."

The Merck Manual: "Renal Cell Carcinoma."

National Cancer Institute: "General Information About Renal Cell Cancer," "Renal Cell Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)," "Renal Cell Cancer."

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on January 21, 2018

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Kidney Cancer (Adult) - Renal Cell Carcinoma."

Medscape: "Renal Cell Carcinoma."

The Merck Manual: "Renal Cell Carcinoma."

National Cancer Institute: "General Information About Renal Cell Cancer," "Renal Cell Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)," "Renal Cell Cancer."

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on January 21, 2018

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