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What causes radiation sickness?

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Radiation sickness happens when a large dose of high-energy radiation goes through your body and reaches your internal organs. It takes far more than what you might get from any medical treatment to cause it. Doctors named the illness, which is technically known as acute radiation syndrome, after the atomic bombings that ended World War II. Some 150,000 to 250,000 people died, many of them from radiation sickness. Since then most victims have been workers or responders to nuclear plant accidents.

From: What Is Radiation Sickness? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Radiation Effects Research Commission: "Frequently Asked Questions."

Garau, M. , July 2011. Reports of Practical Oncology and Radiotherapy

U.S. Atomic Energy Commission: "Medical Effects of Atomic Bombs."

World Health Organization.

International Atomic Energy Agency.

Health Physics Society: "Doses from Medical X-Ray Procedures."

The Mayo Clinic: "Radiation Sickness."

Baverstock, K. , May 2006. Environmental Health Perspectives

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on October 28, 2018

SOURCES:

U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Radiation Effects Research Commission: "Frequently Asked Questions."

Garau, M. , July 2011. Reports of Practical Oncology and Radiotherapy

U.S. Atomic Energy Commission: "Medical Effects of Atomic Bombs."

World Health Organization.

International Atomic Energy Agency.

Health Physics Society: "Doses from Medical X-Ray Procedures."

The Mayo Clinic: "Radiation Sickness."

Baverstock, K. , May 2006. Environmental Health Perspectives

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on October 28, 2018

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What is the history of radiation sickness cases?

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