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What do adrenal hormones do?

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Your adrenal glands have two jobs. The first is to make adrenaline, a hormone your body creates in times of stress. But the more important job is making two steroid hormones, cortisol and aldosterone. Cortisol also helps your body deal with stress. Among its jobs:

Aldosterone keeps the sodium and potassium in your blood balanced, which helps control your blood pressure and the balance of fluids in your body.

  • Controls your blood pressure and your heart rate
  • Controls how your immune system deals with viruses, bacteria, and other threats
  • Puts more sugar in your bloodstream to give you more energy
  • Adjusts how your body breaks down carbohydrates, proteins, and fats

From: What Is Adrenal Insufficiency? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Adrenal Diseases Foundation: "Addison’s Disease."

Pituitary Network Association: "Adrenal Insufficiency (Addison’s Disease)."

National Organization for Rare Disorders: "Addison’s Disease."

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: "Adrenal Insufficiency & Addison’s Disease."

National Adrenal Diseases Foundation: "Secondary Adrenal Insufficiency."

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on August 12, 2019

SOURCES:

National Adrenal Diseases Foundation: "Addison’s Disease."

Pituitary Network Association: "Adrenal Insufficiency (Addison’s Disease)."

National Organization for Rare Disorders: "Addison’s Disease."

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: "Adrenal Insufficiency & Addison’s Disease."

National Adrenal Diseases Foundation: "Secondary Adrenal Insufficiency."

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on August 12, 2019

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