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What does a session with a therapy dog for cancer consist of?

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Therapy sessions look a lot like play. A visit can involve hugging, petting, or talking to the dog. Some people read to the dog, play with it, or even walk it.

From: Ways Dogs Ease Cancer Treatment WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center: "Good Dog: Our Caring Canines Bring a Dose of Cheer Year-Round."

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute: "Therapy dogs bring smiles to kids with cancer."

Moffitt Cancer Center: "Pet Therapy."

MD Anderson Cancer Center: "Animal-Assisted Therapy."

Marin General Hospital: "Therapy Dogs."

Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center: "Pet Visitation Therapy."

Northwestern University Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center: "A Helping Paw: Trained Therapy Dogs Aid Cancer Patients."

Alison Andrew, National Marketing Director, Pet Partners.

Mary R. Burch, PhD, director, Canine Good Citizen Program, American Kennel Club.

American Humane Association: "Canines and Childhood Cancer."

American Kennel Club: “Therapy Dog Organizations”

Therapy Dogs International: “Hospitals (General)

Children's Healthcare of Atlanta: "Pet Therapy."

Caprilli, S. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, published online April 2, 2006.

American Humane Association: "Canines and Childhood Cancer (CCC) Study Summary."

Orlandi, M. Anticancer Research, November-December, 2007.

Sobo, E.J. Journal of Holistic Nursing, March 2006.

Braun, C. Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, May 2009.

Hemsworth, S. European Journal of Oncology Nursing, April 2006.

Lefebvre, S.L. American Journal of Infection Control, March 2008.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: "Guidelines for Environmental Infection Control in Health-Care Facilities."

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center: "Canine Therapy."

Reviewed by Amy Flowers on January 21, 2018

SOURCES:

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center: "Good Dog: Our Caring Canines Bring a Dose of Cheer Year-Round."

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute: "Therapy dogs bring smiles to kids with cancer."

Moffitt Cancer Center: "Pet Therapy."

MD Anderson Cancer Center: "Animal-Assisted Therapy."

Marin General Hospital: "Therapy Dogs."

Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center: "Pet Visitation Therapy."

Northwestern University Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center: "A Helping Paw: Trained Therapy Dogs Aid Cancer Patients."

Alison Andrew, National Marketing Director, Pet Partners.

Mary R. Burch, PhD, director, Canine Good Citizen Program, American Kennel Club.

American Humane Association: "Canines and Childhood Cancer."

American Kennel Club: “Therapy Dog Organizations”

Therapy Dogs International: “Hospitals (General)

Children's Healthcare of Atlanta: "Pet Therapy."

Caprilli, S. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, published online April 2, 2006.

American Humane Association: "Canines and Childhood Cancer (CCC) Study Summary."

Orlandi, M. Anticancer Research, November-December, 2007.

Sobo, E.J. Journal of Holistic Nursing, March 2006.

Braun, C. Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, May 2009.

Hemsworth, S. European Journal of Oncology Nursing, April 2006.

Lefebvre, S.L. American Journal of Infection Control, March 2008.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: "Guidelines for Environmental Infection Control in Health-Care Facilities."

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center: "Canine Therapy."

Reviewed by Amy Flowers on January 21, 2018

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What kind of dogs are therapy dogs for cancer?

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