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What follow-up care will you need after getting papillary thyroid carcinoma treatment?

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At first, you'll get blood tests every few months to check your thyroid hormone levels and get the dose right for your medicine.

Once everything has evened out, you'll get an ultrasound and blood tests every 6-12 months. This is to check that you still have the right dose for your meds and to make sure the cancer hasn't come back.

From: What Is Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Columbia Thyroid Center: "Papillary Thyroid Cancer," "Thyroid Biopsy Clinic."

NIH, National Cancer Institute: "Thyroid Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)-Patient Version."

Mayo Clinic: "Thyroid Cancer."

The American Association of Endocrine Surgeons: "Thyroid cancer: Papillary Thyroid Cancer (PTC)."

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center: "Thyroid Cancer."

National Health Service: "Thyroid Cancer."

Medscape: "Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma."

American Cancer Society: "Treatment of Thyroid Cancer, by Type and Stage."

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on October 30, 2017

SOURCES:

Columbia Thyroid Center: "Papillary Thyroid Cancer," "Thyroid Biopsy Clinic."

NIH, National Cancer Institute: "Thyroid Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)-Patient Version."

Mayo Clinic: "Thyroid Cancer."

The American Association of Endocrine Surgeons: "Thyroid cancer: Papillary Thyroid Cancer (PTC)."

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center: "Thyroid Cancer."

National Health Service: "Thyroid Cancer."

Medscape: "Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma."

American Cancer Society: "Treatment of Thyroid Cancer, by Type and Stage."

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on October 30, 2017

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