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What happens during surgery for carcinoid syndrome?

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Doctors may take out an entire organ that has tumors, such as your appendix, or remove only part of an affected area, such as a section of your bowel. Depending on where the tumor is, surgeons may also use an electric current to burn it off or do cryosurgery to freeze it.

Another option could be radiofrequency ablation. Your surgeon will use an instrument that sends electrical energy into the tumor to kill cancer cells.

From: Carcinoid Syndrome WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Octreotide."

American Family Physician: "Carcinoid Tumors."

Carcinoid Cancer Foundation.

Merck Manual Home Edition: "Carcinoid Tumors and Carcinoid Syndrome," "Carcinoid Syndrome."

National Cancer Institute: "Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors Treatment."

National Organization for Rare Disorders: "Carcinoid Syndrome."

Caring for Carcinoid Foundation: "Carcinoid Syndrome."

Cleveland Clinic: "Radionuclide Scanning (Nuclear Medicine Imaging)."

UpToDate: "Treatment of the carcinoid syndrome."

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on January 19, 2020

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Octreotide."

American Family Physician: "Carcinoid Tumors."

Carcinoid Cancer Foundation.

Merck Manual Home Edition: "Carcinoid Tumors and Carcinoid Syndrome," "Carcinoid Syndrome."

National Cancer Institute: "Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors Treatment."

National Organization for Rare Disorders: "Carcinoid Syndrome."

Caring for Carcinoid Foundation: "Carcinoid Syndrome."

Cleveland Clinic: "Radionuclide Scanning (Nuclear Medicine Imaging)."

UpToDate: "Treatment of the carcinoid syndrome."

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on January 19, 2020

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