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What is a biopsy and how is it used to diagnose throat cancer?

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A biopsy collects a tissue sample that gets examined under a microscope to look for cancer cells. It’s the only way to know for sure if a tumor is cancer and what kind it is. The procedure may be done with surgery, fine needles, or an endoscope -- a flexible tube with a camera that’s lowered into the throat through your nose or mouth. A tool on the end will take the biopsy.

SOURCES:

MD Anderson Cancer Center: “Throat Cancer Facts."

Mayo Clinic: “Throat Cancer.”

The Cleveland Clinic: “Exploring Options for Head & Neck Cancer.”

Mount Sinai Hospital: “What is Throat Cancer?”

American Society of Clinical Oncologists: “Head and Neck Cancer: Risk Factors and Prevention.”

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: “Alcohol and Public Health,” “HPV Vaccines: Vaccinating Your Preteen or Teen.”

National Cancer Institute: “Oropharyngeal Cancer Treatment,” “Stages of Oropharyngeal Cancer,” “Stages of Laryngeal Cancer.”

American Cancer Society: “Lifestyle changes after laryngeal or hypopharyngeal cancer.”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on March 18, 2018

SOURCES:

MD Anderson Cancer Center: “Throat Cancer Facts."

Mayo Clinic: “Throat Cancer.”

The Cleveland Clinic: “Exploring Options for Head & Neck Cancer.”

Mount Sinai Hospital: “What is Throat Cancer?”

American Society of Clinical Oncologists: “Head and Neck Cancer: Risk Factors and Prevention.”

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: “Alcohol and Public Health,” “HPV Vaccines: Vaccinating Your Preteen or Teen.”

National Cancer Institute: “Oropharyngeal Cancer Treatment,” “Stages of Oropharyngeal Cancer,” “Stages of Laryngeal Cancer.”

American Cancer Society: “Lifestyle changes after laryngeal or hypopharyngeal cancer.”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on March 18, 2018

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