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What is integrative medicine?

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Integrative medicine pairs traditional medicine with other treatments to care for your mind, body, and spirit. For example, your doctor may suggest chemotherapy to fight cancer as well as acupuncture to help manage its side effects.

It isn’t just medicine. Your care team may also design a plan to help you build healthy behaviors and skills -- like smart eating habits and stress-busting activities. These things can keep you healthy for the long term.

Integrative medicine uses complementary treatments, but they have to be backed by good science. Always tell your doctor before you try a nontraditional treatment. That way, you’ll know if it’s safe and likely to work.

From: What Is Integrative Medicine? WebMD Medical Reference

Duke Integrative Medicine: “What is Integrative Medicine?”

American Board of Physician Specialties: “The Advantages and Benefits to Integrative Medicine.”

National Cancer Institute: “Complementary and Alternative Medicine.”

University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center: “Integrative Medicine Center Clinical Services.”

American Society of Clinical Oncology: “Types of Complementary Therapies,” “Evaluating Complementary and Alternative Therapies.”

UpToDate: “Patient education: Complementary and alternative medicine treatments (CAM) for cancer (Beyond the Basics).”

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health: “Complementary, Alternative, or Integrative Health: What’s In a Name?” “Meditation: “In Depth,” “Yoga: In Depth.”

Reviewed by Sabrina Felson on May 25, 2019

Duke Integrative Medicine: “What is Integrative Medicine?”

American Board of Physician Specialties: “The Advantages and Benefits to Integrative Medicine.”

National Cancer Institute: “Complementary and Alternative Medicine.”

University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center: “Integrative Medicine Center Clinical Services.”

American Society of Clinical Oncology: “Types of Complementary Therapies,” “Evaluating Complementary and Alternative Therapies.”

UpToDate: “Patient education: Complementary and alternative medicine treatments (CAM) for cancer (Beyond the Basics).”

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health: “Complementary, Alternative, or Integrative Health: What’s In a Name?” “Meditation: “In Depth,” “Yoga: In Depth.”

Reviewed by Sabrina Felson on May 25, 2019

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