PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What is the treatment for bile duct cancer?

ANSWER

For some people, treatment can destroy the cancer. In others, it may never go away entirely. While this is hard to hear, you can live with it. You may need regular doses of chemotherapy, radiation, or other treatments to keep it in check. Though it’s a challenge to manage the stress, worry, and concerns about the future that come along with a cancer diagnosis, it’s important to learn about your illness and to gather support from your medical team, family, and friends.

From: Cholangiocarcinoma (Bile Duct Cancer) WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: “Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma),” “What is bile duct cancer?” “Signs and symptoms of bile duct cancer,” “How is bile duct cancer diagnosed?” “What should you ask your doctor about bile duct cancer?” “Surgery for bile duct cancer.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma).”

University of Rochester Medical Center: “Can I Survive Bile Duct Cancer? What Is My Prognosis?”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on February 9, 2020

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: “Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma),” “What is bile duct cancer?” “Signs and symptoms of bile duct cancer,” “How is bile duct cancer diagnosed?” “What should you ask your doctor about bile duct cancer?” “Surgery for bile duct cancer.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Bile Duct Cancer (Cholangiocarcinoma).”

University of Rochester Medical Center: “Can I Survive Bile Duct Cancer? What Is My Prognosis?”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on February 9, 2020

NEXT QUESTION:

What causes bile duct cancer?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

"ALEXA, ASK WEBMD"

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.