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What is the treatment for pheochromocytomas?

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You’ll most likely need surgery to remove the tumor. Your surgeon may be able to do this using tiny cuts instead of one large opening. This is called laparoscopic, or minimally invasive, surgery. It can shorten your recovery time.

Before the surgery, you may need to take medication to lower your blood pressure and control an occasional fast heart rate.

If you have a tumor in only one adrenal gland, your surgeon will probably remove that whole gland. Your other gland will still make the hormones your body needs.

From: What Is Pheochromocytoma? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Organization for Rare Diseases: “Pheochromocytoma.”

Medscape: “Pheochromocytoma Treatment & Management.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Adrenal Glands.”

UpToDate.com : “Clinical presentation and diagnosis of pheochromocytoma.”

OncoLink (Penn Medicine): “All About Pheochromocytoma.”

Zuber, S. , June 2012. Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinics of North America

Dana Farber Cancer Institute: “Ask the cancer genetics team: inherited tendency for pheochromocytomas.”

University of Maryland Medical Center: “Adrenal Glands.”

Medscape: “Pediatric Pheochromocytoma Treatment & Management.”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on July 11, 2018

SOURCES:

National Organization for Rare Diseases: “Pheochromocytoma.”

Medscape: “Pheochromocytoma Treatment & Management.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Adrenal Glands.”

UpToDate.com : “Clinical presentation and diagnosis of pheochromocytoma.”

OncoLink (Penn Medicine): “All About Pheochromocytoma.”

Zuber, S. , June 2012. Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinics of North America

Dana Farber Cancer Institute: “Ask the cancer genetics team: inherited tendency for pheochromocytomas.”

University of Maryland Medical Center: “Adrenal Glands.”

Medscape: “Pediatric Pheochromocytoma Treatment & Management.”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on July 11, 2018

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