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How do you treat soft tissue sarcoma?

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It depends on where the cancer is and how far it's spread, but surgery is usually the first step. The doctor will try to take out any tumors without damaging the healthy tissue around them.

They might take out lymph nodes as well, to make sure your sarcoma hasn't reached them and spread to other places in your body. And that may be all it takes.

But if a sarcoma has spread to other parts of your body, your doctor also may recommend chemotherapy or radiation therapy. These treatments can damage normal cells along with the cancerous ones, and that can cause side effects, which depend on where the sarcoma is.

There may be a clinical trial for your type of sarcoma, too.

From: What Is a Soft Tissue Sarcoma? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Cancer Institute.

American Cancer Society.

The Mayo Clinic: “Soft Tissue Sarcoma.”

Sarcoma Foundation of America: “Patient resources.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Sarcoma.”

American Society of Clinical Oncologists.

Cancer Research UK: “Living with Soft Tissue Sarcoma.”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on February 28, 2018

SOURCES:

National Cancer Institute.

American Cancer Society.

The Mayo Clinic: “Soft Tissue Sarcoma.”

Sarcoma Foundation of America: “Patient resources.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Sarcoma.”

American Society of Clinical Oncologists.

Cancer Research UK: “Living with Soft Tissue Sarcoma.”

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on February 28, 2018

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How are radioactive pellets or radiation therapy used to treat soft tissue sarcoma?

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