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What should you expect if you have polycythemia vera?

ANSWER

Although there's no cure, treatment can let you manage this disease for many years. Everyone's case is different. With good care, you can still have an active lifestyle.

It's rare, but your condition may lead to acute leukemia or myelofibrosis, which are also blood diseases but are more serious than polycythemia vera. Acute leukemia is a blood cancer that gets worse quickly. Myelofibrosis is a condition that fills your bone marrow with scar tissue.

SOURCES:

FamilyDoctor.org: "Polycythemia Vera."

National Cancer Institute: "Polycythemia Vera."

National Organization for Rare Disorders: "Polycythemia Vera."

MPN Research Foundation: "Polycythemia Vera."

University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics: "Polycythemia Vera."

New York-Presbyterian Hospital: "Polycythemia Vera."

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "Polycythemia Vera."

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: "How Is Polycythemia Vera Diagnosed?"

Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario on October 19, 2020

SOURCES:

FamilyDoctor.org: "Polycythemia Vera."

National Cancer Institute: "Polycythemia Vera."

National Organization for Rare Disorders: "Polycythemia Vera."

MPN Research Foundation: "Polycythemia Vera."

University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics: "Polycythemia Vera."

New York-Presbyterian Hospital: "Polycythemia Vera."

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "Polycythemia Vera."

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: "How Is Polycythemia Vera Diagnosed?"

Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario on October 19, 2020

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Where can you get support for polycythemia vera?

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