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Where did Agent Orange get its name?

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It's called Agent Orange because of the orange stripes on the drums that carried it.

From: What Is Agent Orange? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Fallon, H. (chair), Institute of Medicine Committee to Review the Health Effects in Vietnam Veterans of Exposure to Herbicides, . Veterans and Agent Orange: Health Effects of Herbicides Used in Vietnam

Hertz-Picciotto, I. (chair), Institute of Medicine Committee to Review the Health Effects in Vietnam Veterans of Exposure to Herbicides, . Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 11 (2018)

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs: "Facts About Herbicides," "Diseases related to Agent Orange," "Birth Defects in Children of Vietnam and Korea Veterans," "Chronic B-cell Leukemias and Agent Orange," "Prostate Cancer and Agent Orange," "Birth Defects in Children of Women Vietnam Veterans," "Agent Orange Registry Health Exam for Veterans."

American Cancer Society: "Known and Probable Human Carcinogens," "Agent Orange and Cancer Risk."

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences: "Dioxins."

U.S. Congress (congress.gov): "H.R.556 - Agent Orange Act of 1991."

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine: "Hypertension Upgraded in Latest Biennial Review of Research on Health Problems in Veterans That May Be Linked to Agent Orange Exposure During Vietnam War."

American Heart Association: "High Blood Pressure."

Mayo Clinic: "Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS)."

Stellman, J. , published online June 2018. American Journal of Public Health

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on September 16, 2019

SOURCES:

Fallon, H. (chair), Institute of Medicine Committee to Review the Health Effects in Vietnam Veterans of Exposure to Herbicides, . Veterans and Agent Orange: Health Effects of Herbicides Used in Vietnam

Hertz-Picciotto, I. (chair), Institute of Medicine Committee to Review the Health Effects in Vietnam Veterans of Exposure to Herbicides, . Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 11 (2018)

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs: "Facts About Herbicides," "Diseases related to Agent Orange," "Birth Defects in Children of Vietnam and Korea Veterans," "Chronic B-cell Leukemias and Agent Orange," "Prostate Cancer and Agent Orange," "Birth Defects in Children of Women Vietnam Veterans," "Agent Orange Registry Health Exam for Veterans."

American Cancer Society: "Known and Probable Human Carcinogens," "Agent Orange and Cancer Risk."

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences: "Dioxins."

U.S. Congress (congress.gov): "H.R.556 - Agent Orange Act of 1991."

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine: "Hypertension Upgraded in Latest Biennial Review of Research on Health Problems in Veterans That May Be Linked to Agent Orange Exposure During Vietnam War."

American Heart Association: "High Blood Pressure."

Mayo Clinic: "Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS)."

Stellman, J. , published online June 2018. American Journal of Public Health

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin on September 16, 2019

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Which illnesses are tied to Agent Orange?

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