PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

Who pays for clinical trials?

ANSWER

Health plans often cover routine care when you’re part of a clinical trial. This can include:

But insurance usually doesn’t cover some costs, like the immunotherapy drug being tested, plus any tests and scans done only for research. The trial's sponsor may cover these research costs. Check with your health insurance company.

  • Doctor visits
  • Hospital stays
  • Standard cancer treatments
  • Treatments that cut side effects
  • Treatments to ease cancer symptoms, like pain
  • Lab tests
  • X-rays, MRIs, etc.

SOURCES:

Cancer Research Institute: “About Clinical Trials,” “Should You Participate?” 

National Cancer Institute: "Deciding to Take Part in a Clinical Trial,” "Insurance Coverage and Clinical Trials,” “Paying for Clinical Trials,” "Phases of Clinical Trials,” "Questions to Ask Your Doctor about Treatment Clinical Trials," “What Are Clinical Trials?” “Where Trials Take Place.”

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on January 23, 2019

SOURCES:

Cancer Research Institute: “About Clinical Trials,” “Should You Participate?” 

National Cancer Institute: "Deciding to Take Part in a Clinical Trial,” "Insurance Coverage and Clinical Trials,” “Paying for Clinical Trials,” "Phases of Clinical Trials,” "Questions to Ask Your Doctor about Treatment Clinical Trials," “What Are Clinical Trials?” “Where Trials Take Place.”

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on January 23, 2019

NEXT QUESTION:

What questions should I ask my doctor before doing an immunotherapy clinical trial?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.