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Will my body get used to the immunotherapy used to treat my cancer?

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Over time, immunotherapy may stop having an effect on your cancer cells. This means that even if you have a good response at first, your tumor could start to grow again.

From: Pros and Cons of Immunotherapy WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Cancer Institute: “Immunotherapy.”

American Cancer Society: “What is cancer immunotherapy?”

Cancer Research Institute/I’m the Answer to Cancer: “Benefits of Cancer Immunotherapy.”

Cancer Research Institute: “About Clinical Trials,” “Cancer Immunotherapy: Should You Participate?”

Cancer Support Community: “Frankly Speaking About Cancer: Your Immune System & Cancer Treatment.”

UT San Antonio Cancer Therapy & Research Center: “Immunotherapy.”

University of California San Francisco: “Killing Cancer Through the Immune System.”

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute: “What are the Side Effects of Immunotherapy?”

Vanderbilt University Medical Center: “Study details rare heart risk of certain cancer therapies.”

American Society of Clinical Oncology/Cancer.net: “Immunotherapy 2.0: The 2017 Clinical Cancer Advance of the Year,” “Understanding Immunotherapy.”

Coalition of Cancer Cooperative Groups: “Learn About Cancer Clinical Trials.”

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on January 23, 2019

SOURCES:

National Cancer Institute: “Immunotherapy.”

American Cancer Society: “What is cancer immunotherapy?”

Cancer Research Institute/I’m the Answer to Cancer: “Benefits of Cancer Immunotherapy.”

Cancer Research Institute: “About Clinical Trials,” “Cancer Immunotherapy: Should You Participate?”

Cancer Support Community: “Frankly Speaking About Cancer: Your Immune System & Cancer Treatment.”

UT San Antonio Cancer Therapy & Research Center: “Immunotherapy.”

University of California San Francisco: “Killing Cancer Through the Immune System.”

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute: “What are the Side Effects of Immunotherapy?”

Vanderbilt University Medical Center: “Study details rare heart risk of certain cancer therapies.”

American Society of Clinical Oncology/Cancer.net: “Immunotherapy 2.0: The 2017 Clinical Cancer Advance of the Year,” “Understanding Immunotherapy.”

Coalition of Cancer Cooperative Groups: “Learn About Cancer Clinical Trials.”

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on January 23, 2019

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