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How can you prevent urinary tract infections (UTIs) in your kids?

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Change your baby's diapers often to prevent bacteria from growing. As your child gets older, teach her good bathroom habits to prevent UTIs. Instruct girls to wipe from front to back. This helps to prevent bacteria in poop from getting into the vagina and urinary tract. Encourage your kids to go to the bathroom as soon as they feel the urge -- not to hold it in.

Girls should avoid bubble baths and should not use perfumed soaps. And, they should wear cotton underwear -- not nylon -- to improve airflow and prevent bacteria from growing.

Have your kids drink lots of water, which helps flush bacteria out of the urinary tract. Extra water also prevents constipation, which can create blockages in the urinary tract that allow bacteria to grow.

From: If Your Child Gets a UTI WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: "Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) In Children."

Nemours Foundation: "Urinary Tract Infections."

Urology Care Foundation: "After Treatment," "How are UTIs Diagnosed in Children?" "How Are UTIs Treated in Children?" "What Are the Signs of UTIs in Children?" "What Causes UTIs in Children?" "What is a Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) in Children?"

Reviewed by Amita Shroff on February 20, 2019

SOURCES:

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: "Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) In Children."

Nemours Foundation: "Urinary Tract Infections."

Urology Care Foundation: "After Treatment," "How are UTIs Diagnosed in Children?" "How Are UTIs Treated in Children?" "What Are the Signs of UTIs in Children?" "What Causes UTIs in Children?" "What is a Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) in Children?"

Reviewed by Amita Shroff on February 20, 2019

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