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How can you tell if food poisoning is causing your child to throw up?

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Anytime germs hitch a ride on food your kids eat, there’s a chance they could get a food-borne illness (food poisoning). Some of the bacteria that usually hide in food are:

You can get food poisoning from almost any food, especially if it hasn’t been cooked or stored correctly. Your child might start throwing up within a couple of hours of eating contaminated food. Sometimes it can take a day or two for symptoms to show up. Usually, your child will also have nausea, watery diarrhea, and stomach pain. It’s possible for food poisoning to cause fever, but it’s common for it to cause throwing up with no fever, too. Symptoms can last anywhere from a couple of hours to several days.

  • Salmonella
  • Listeria
  • Campylobacter
  • E. coli

SOURCES:

Kids Health: “Stomach Flu,” “Food Poisoning,” “Concussion.”

Merck Manual: “Gastroenteritis in Children.”

Mayo Clinic: “Viral gastroenteritis (stomach flu),” “Food poisoning.”

Minnesota Department of Health: “Norovirus Fact Sheet.”

CDC: “Norovirus.”

American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology: “Food Allergy.”

UpToDate: “Patient Education: Food Poisoning (Foodborne Illness),” “Patient Education: Nausea and Vomiting in Infants and Children.”

Medscape: “Vomiting in the Pediatric Age Group.”

American Academy of Pediatrics: “Vomiting Without Diarrhea,” “Car Sickness.”

Migraine Research Foundation: “Migraines in Kids and Teens.”

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on March 24, 2017

SOURCES:

Kids Health: “Stomach Flu,” “Food Poisoning,” “Concussion.”

Merck Manual: “Gastroenteritis in Children.”

Mayo Clinic: “Viral gastroenteritis (stomach flu),” “Food poisoning.”

Minnesota Department of Health: “Norovirus Fact Sheet.”

CDC: “Norovirus.”

American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology: “Food Allergy.”

UpToDate: “Patient Education: Food Poisoning (Foodborne Illness),” “Patient Education: Nausea and Vomiting in Infants and Children.”

Medscape: “Vomiting in the Pediatric Age Group.”

American Academy of Pediatrics: “Vomiting Without Diarrhea,” “Car Sickness.”

Migraine Research Foundation: “Migraines in Kids and Teens.”

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on March 24, 2017

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