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How does a phenylketonuria (PKU) test work?

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A health care worker at the hospital will take a blood sample no earlier than 24 hours after your baby is born. If you gave birth outside a hospital, bring your infant to a doctor in a day or two to get all the newborn screenings.

Usually, the blood is taken through a prick in your newborn’s heel. It’s put on a special paper and sent to a lab. Your baby’s doctor will share the results with you.

From: What Is a PKU Test? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

CDC: “Newborn Screening.”

The Nemours Foundation: “Newborn Screening Tests.”

National PKU Alliance: “About PKU.”

The University of Rochester Medical Center: “Phenylketonuria (PKU).”

March of Dimes: “PKU (Phenylketonuria) In Your Baby.”

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: “How to Create a PKU-Friendly Diet.”

Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development: “What are common treatments for phenylketonuria (PKU)?”

Reviewed by Louise Chang on August 16, 2018

SOURCES:

CDC: “Newborn Screening.”

The Nemours Foundation: “Newborn Screening Tests.”

National PKU Alliance: “About PKU.”

The University of Rochester Medical Center: “Phenylketonuria (PKU).”

March of Dimes: “PKU (Phenylketonuria) In Your Baby.”

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: “How to Create a PKU-Friendly Diet.”

Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development: “What are common treatments for phenylketonuria (PKU)?”

Reviewed by Louise Chang on August 16, 2018

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What does the phenylketonuria (PKU) test result mean?

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