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How is sever's disease treated?

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Symptoms typically go away after a few months. The best treatment is simply rest. Your child will need to stop or cut down on sports until the pain gets better. When he's well enough to play, have him build up playing time gradually.

The doctor may also recommend:

  • Ice packs or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen or naproxen
  • Supportive shoes and inserts that reduce stress on the heel bone
  • Stretching and strengthening exercises
  • In severe cases, your child may need a cast so his heel is forced to rest.

From: What Is Sever’s Disease? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Boston Children’s Hospital: “Sever’s Disease in Children.”

University of Rochester Medical Center: “Sever’s Disease”

KidsHealth: “Sever’s Disease.”

Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York Presbyterian: “Sever’s Disease.”

University of California, Davis Medical Group: “Sever’s Disease.”

St. Louis Children’s Hospital: “Sever’s Disease.”

Washington University Orthopedics: “Sever’s Disease.”

Family Doctor: “Sever’s Disease.”

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: “Overuse Injuries in Children.”

University of Pittsburgh Medical Center: “Sever’s Disease.”

Reviewed by Renee A. Alli on December 14, 2018

SOURCES:

Boston Children’s Hospital: “Sever’s Disease in Children.”

University of Rochester Medical Center: “Sever’s Disease”

KidsHealth: “Sever’s Disease.”

Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York Presbyterian: “Sever’s Disease.”

University of California, Davis Medical Group: “Sever’s Disease.”

St. Louis Children’s Hospital: “Sever’s Disease.”

Washington University Orthopedics: “Sever’s Disease.”

Family Doctor: “Sever’s Disease.”

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: “Overuse Injuries in Children.”

University of Pittsburgh Medical Center: “Sever’s Disease.”

Reviewed by Renee A. Alli on December 14, 2018

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How can sever's disease be prevented?

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