PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What are adenoids?

ANSWER

Adenoids are a mass of tissue that, along with your tonsils, help keep you healthy by trapping harmful germs that pass through the nose or mouth. Your adenoids also produce antibodies to help your body fight infections. Unlike tonsils, which can be easily seen by opening your mouth, you cannot see the adenoids. A doctor has to use a small mirror or special instrument with a light to see the adenoids. Sometimes X-rays may be taken to see them more clearly.

While adenoids play an important role in keeping a person healthy, as you get older, adenoids become less important, because your body is able to fight infection in other ways. In fact, adenoids often get smaller around age 5 or 6 and virtually disappear by the teen years.

From: Adenoiditis WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:





MedlinePlus: "Tonsils and Adenoids." Nemours: "Enlarged Adenoids" and "All About Adenoids." American Academy of Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck Surgery: "Fact Sheet: Tonsils and Adenoids" and "Tonsils and Adenoids." Children's Hospital St. Louis: "Tonsillectomy and Adenoidectomy."

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on June 25, 2019

SOURCES:





MedlinePlus: "Tonsils and Adenoids." Nemours: "Enlarged Adenoids" and "All About Adenoids." American Academy of Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck Surgery: "Fact Sheet: Tonsils and Adenoids" and "Tonsils and Adenoids." Children's Hospital St. Louis: "Tonsillectomy and Adenoidectomy."

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on June 25, 2019

NEXT QUESTION:

What is adenoiditis?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.